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AUI’s Tim Spuck, co-editor of Einstein Fellows

Recent News

2024 Jansky Fellows Awarded

The National Science Foundation’s National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) has named Adam Dong and Kyle Massingill as 2024 Jansky Fellows.

Orion’s Erupting Star System Reveals Its Secrets

FUor stars flare suddenly, erupting in brightness, before dimming again many years later. It is now understood that this brightening is due to the stars taking in energy from their surroundings via gravitational accretion, the main force that shapes stars and planets. However, how and why this happens remained a mystery—until now, thanks to astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).

AUI’s Tim Spuck, co-editor of Einstein Fellows

Tim Spuck is the AUI STEM Education Development Officer for the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. He earned his master’s degree in science education from Clarion University of Pennsylvania and is nearing completion of a D.Ed. in curriculum and instruction at West Virginia University.

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education is seen by leaders from across the globe as key to economic success and prosperity. Einstein Fellows attempts to improve the state of STEM education, not only here in the United States, but internationally as well. As the body of STEM-learning research grows, this volume provides the unique perspective of nationally recognized educators who have spent, collectively, more than 400,000 hours at the interface between teaching and learning. Each chapter communicates how its author has implemented a specific STEM practice in the classroom and how the practice might be modified for use in other classrooms, schools, and learning environments.

Recent News

2024 Jansky Fellows Awarded

The National Science Foundation’s National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) has named Adam Dong and Kyle Massingill as 2024 Jansky Fellows.

Orion’s Erupting Star System Reveals Its Secrets

FUor stars flare suddenly, erupting in brightness, before dimming again many years later. It is now understood that this brightening is due to the stars taking in energy from their surroundings via gravitational accretion, the main force that shapes stars and planets. However, how and why this happens remained a mystery—until now, thanks to astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).