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Advancing STEM Education – AUI’s STEM Education Development Officer Releases Book

July 25, 2014
At a recent book release event hosted by the Woodrow Wilson International Center forScholars, Einstein Fellows: Best Practices in STEM Education received strong reviews… Read More
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  • NRAO's highly regarded 40 Foot Telescope, the cornerstone of Green Bank's educational initiatives and the starting point for many future astronomers, including the students of RATs.
    NRAO's highly regarded 40 Foot Telescope, the cornerstone of Green Bank's educational initiatives and the starting point for many future astronomers, including the students of RATs. NRAO/AUI/NSF

NRAO Media Tip Sheet June 2014: Science, engineering, and technology milestones

June 27, 2014
Topics in this issue: 1. VLBA Helps Measure Expansion in the Current Universe: The VLBA and other radio telescopes tracked the motion of 429 distant celestial objects to better calculate how fast the Universe is expanding… Read More
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  • Artist impression of a white dwarf star in orbit with pulsar PSR J2222-0137. It may be the coolest and dimmest white dwarf ever identified.
    Artist impression of a white dwarf star in orbit with pulsar PSR J2222-0137. It may be the coolest and dimmest white dwarf ever identified. B. Saxton (NRAO/AUI/NSF)

Remarkable White Dwarf Star Possibly Coldest, Dimmest Ever Detected

June 23, 2014
A team of astronomers has identified possibly the coldest, faintest white dwarf star ever detected. This ancient stellar remnant is so cool that its carbon has crystallized, forming — in effect — an Earth-size diamond in space… Read More
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Science

  • Mare Serenitatis / Sea of Serenity
    Mare Serenitatis / Sea of Serenity Bruce Campbell (Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum); Arecibo/NAIC; NRAO/AUI/NSF

New Radar Images Uncover Remarkable Features below the Surface of the Moon

May 14, 2014
Sea of Serenity and Aristillus Crater New images of Earth’s Moon reveal more than can be seen with the naked eye, thanks to the combined efforts of the two largest radio telescopes of their kind — the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia and the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico… Read More
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  • Artist's concept of the Milky Way Galaxy.
    Artist's concept of the Milky Way Galaxy. NASA JPL

Welcome to the Milky Way Explorer

April 3, 2014
Welcome to the Milky Way Explorer, a guided trip through our spiral Galaxy and its neighborhood. You choose where to explore, and a radio astronomer talks to you about each stop… Read More
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  • This composite image contains three distinct features: the bright star-filled central region of galaxy NGC 6946 in optical light (blue), the dense hydrogen tracing out the galaxy’s sweeping spiral arms and galactic halo (orange), and the extremely diffuse and extended field of hydrogen engulfing NGC 6946 and its companions (red). The new GBT data show the faintly glowing hydrogen bridging the gulf between the larger galaxy and its smaller companions. This faint structure is precisely what astronomers expect to appear as hydrogen flows from the intergalactic medium into galaxies or from a past encounter between galaxies.
    This composite image contains three distinct features: the bright star-filled central region of galaxy NGC 6946 in optical light (blue), the dense hydrogen tracing out the galaxy’s sweeping spiral arms and galactic halo (orange), and the extremely diffuse and extended field of hydrogen engulfing NGC 6946 and its companions (red). The new GBT data show the faintly glowing hydrogen bridging the gulf between the larger galaxy and its smaller companions. This faint structure is precisely what astronomers expect to appear as hydrogen flows from the intergalactic medium into galaxies or from a past encounter between galaxies. D.J. Pisano (WVU); B. Saxton (NRAO/AUI/NSF); Palomar Observatory – Space Telescope Science Institute 2nd Digital Sky Survey (Caltech); Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope

River of Hydrogen Flowing through Space Seen with Green Bank Telescop

January 27, 2014
Using the National Science Foundation’s Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), astronomer D.J. Pisano from West Virginia University has discovered what could be a never-before-seen river of hydrogen flowing through space… Read More
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Alma

  • Close-in view of the artist’s conception of the environment around the gamma ray burst GRB 020819B based on ALMA observations.
    Close-in view of the artist’s conception of the environment around the gamma ray burst GRB 020819B based on ALMA observations. NAOJ

Gigantic Explosion Buried in Dust: ALMA Probes Environment around Gamma Ray Bursts

June 11, 2014
Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), a team of researchers reports the first-ever detection of molecular gas — the fuel for star formation — in two galaxies that were previously rocked by gamma ray bursts (GRBs), the brightest explosions in the Universe… Read More
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  • Christophe Jacques of the NRAO inspects the wiring on ALMA's new hydrogen maser atomic clock during installation.
    Christophe Jacques of the NRAO inspects the wiring on ALMA's new hydrogen maser atomic clock during installation. Carlos Padilla (NRAO/AUI/NSF)

ALMA Upgrade to Supercharge Event Horizon Telescope, Astronomy’s ‘Killer App’

June 4, 2014
Scientists recently upgraded the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) by installing an ultraprecise atomic clock at ALMA’s Array Operations Site, home to the observatory’s supercomputing correlator… Read More
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  • This artist's concept shows two proplyds, or protostars, around a massive O-type star. The nearer proplyd is having its planet-forming dust and gas blasted away by the radiation from the star. The farther proplyd is able to retain its planet-making potential.
    This artist's concept shows two proplyds, or protostars, around a massive O-type star. The nearer proplyd is having its planet-forming dust and gas blasted away by the radiation from the star. The farther proplyd is able to retain its planet-making potential. NRAO/AUI/NSF; B. Saxton

'Death Stars' in Orion Blast Planets before They Even Form

March 10, 2014
The Orion Nebula is home to hundreds of young stars and even younger protostars known as proplyds. Many of these nascent systems will go on to develop planets, while others will have their planet-forming dust and gas blasted away by the fierce ultraviolet radiation emitted by massive O-type stars that lurk nearby… Read More
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