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News

  • CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF

Observatory Supports Fundraising Run for Boston Marathon Victims

March 25, 2014
National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Public Information Officer Dave Finley presents a check from Associated Universities, Inc… Read More
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  • Dr. Ethan Schreier, President of AUI, pays his respects to the new President of Chile, Michelle Bachelet.
    Dr. Ethan Schreier, President of AUI, pays his respects to the new President of Chile, Michelle Bachelet. Presidency of the Republic of Chile

AUI/NRAO Delegation Is Invited To Changing of Government Activities

March 14, 2014
Dr. Ethan Schreier, President of Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) – representative of the North American fraction of ALMA Observatory, together with his wife, Dr… Read More
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  • This artist's concept illustrates the preferred model for explaining ALMA observations of Beta Pictoris. At the outer fringes of the system, the gravitational influence of a hypothetical giant planet (bottom left) captures comets into a dense, massive swarm (right) where frequent collisions occur.
    This artist's concept illustrates the preferred model for explaining ALMA observations of Beta Pictoris. At the outer fringes of the system, the gravitational influence of a hypothetical giant planet (bottom left) captures comets into a dense, massive swarm (right) where frequent collisions occur. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/F. Reddy

ALMA Sees Icy Wreckage in Nearby Solar System

March 6, 2014
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) telescope have discovered the splattered remains of comets colliding together around a nearby star; the researchers believe they are witnessing the total destruction of one of these icy bodies once every five minutes… Read More
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Science

  • Artist's concept of the Milky Way Galaxy.
    Artist's concept of the Milky Way Galaxy. NASA JPL

Welcome to the Milky Way Explorer

April 3, 2014
Welcome to the Milky Way Explorer, a guided trip through our spiral Galaxy and its neighborhood. You choose where to explore, and a radio astronomer talks to you about each stop… Read More
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  • This composite image contains three distinct features: the bright star-filled central region of galaxy NGC 6946 in optical light (blue), the dense hydrogen tracing out the galaxy’s sweeping spiral arms and galactic halo (orange), and the extremely diffuse and extended field of hydrogen engulfing NGC 6946 and its companions (red). The new GBT data show the faintly glowing hydrogen bridging the gulf between the larger galaxy and its smaller companions. This faint structure is precisely what astronomers expect to appear as hydrogen flows from the intergalactic medium into galaxies or from a past encounter between galaxies.
    This composite image contains three distinct features: the bright star-filled central region of galaxy NGC 6946 in optical light (blue), the dense hydrogen tracing out the galaxy’s sweeping spiral arms and galactic halo (orange), and the extremely diffuse and extended field of hydrogen engulfing NGC 6946 and its companions (red). The new GBT data show the faintly glowing hydrogen bridging the gulf between the larger galaxy and its smaller companions. This faint structure is precisely what astronomers expect to appear as hydrogen flows from the intergalactic medium into galaxies or from a past encounter between galaxies. D.J. Pisano (WVU); B. Saxton (NRAO/AUI/NSF); Palomar Observatory – Space Telescope Science Institute 2nd Digital Sky Survey (Caltech); Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope

River of Hydrogen Flowing through Space Seen with Green Bank Telescop

January 27, 2014
Using the National Science Foundation’s Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), astronomer D.J. Pisano from West Virginia University has discovered what could be a never-before-seen river of hydrogen flowing through space… Read More
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  • Millisecond pulsar, left foreground, is orbited by a hot white dwarf star, center, both of which are orbited by another, more-distant and cooler white dwarf, top right.
    Millisecond pulsar, left foreground, is orbited by a hot white dwarf star, center, both of which are orbited by another, more-distant and cooler white dwarf, top right. Bill Saxton; NRAO/AUI/NSF

Pulsar in a Stellar Triple System Makes Unique Gravitational Laboratory

January 5, 2014
Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have discovered a unique stellar system of two white dwarf stars and a superdense neutron star, all packed within a space smaller than Earth's orbit around the Sun… Read More
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Alma

  • This artist's concept shows two proplyds, or protostars, around a massive O-type star. The nearer proplyd is having its planet-forming dust and gas blasted away by the radiation from the star. The farther proplyd is able to retain its planet-making potential.
    This artist's concept shows two proplyds, or protostars, around a massive O-type star. The nearer proplyd is having its planet-forming dust and gas blasted away by the radiation from the star. The farther proplyd is able to retain its planet-making potential. NRAO/AUI/NSF; B. Saxton

'Death Stars' in Orion Blast Planets before They Even Form

March 10, 2014
The Orion Nebula is home to hundreds of young stars and even younger protostars known as proplyds. Many of these nascent systems will go on to develop planets, while others will have their planet-forming dust and gas blasted away by the fierce ultraviolet radiation emitted by massive O-type stars that lurk nearby… Read More
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  • Bob Simon and Pierre Cox
    Bob Simon and Pierre Cox CBS NEWS

ALMA: Peering Into The Universe's Past

March 9, 2014
The following script is from "ALMA" which aired on March 9, 2014. Bob Simon is the correspondent. Michael Gavshon and David Levine, producers… Read More
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  • This artist's illustration of supernova 1987A reveals the cold, inner regions of the exploded star's remnants (in red) where tremendous amounts of dust were detected and imaged by ALMA. This inner region is contrasted with the outer shell (lacy white and blue circles), where the energy from the supernova is colliding with the envelope of gas ejected from the star prior to its powerful detonation.
    This artist's illustration of supernova 1987A reveals the cold, inner regions of the exploded star's remnants (in red) where tremendous amounts of dust were detected and imaged by ALMA. This inner region is contrasted with the outer shell (lacy white and blue circles), where the energy from the supernova is colliding with the envelope of gas ejected from the star prior to its powerful detonation. Alexandra Angelich (NRAO/AUI/NSF)

Supernova’s Super Dust Factory Imaged with ALMA

January 6, 2014
Galaxies can be remarkably dusty places and supernovas are thought to be a primary source of that dust, especially in the early Universe… Read More
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